Maps

I am drawn to maps like a magnet, an interest that I have had since I was a little girl. I remember unfolding the road maps that my parents kept in the backseat pockets our station wagon and being drawn to thick atlases on display at gas station checkout lines. This interest extended to collecting state quarters throughout elementary school and excitedly placing the shiny new ones into their proper place on my foldable chipboard map. At one point I remember my mom purchasing a children’s atlas for me to flip through, including facts about the population and cultures of the area shown on each page. I had the maps of the Disney World parks taped up on my bedroom wall throughout middle and high school. In seventh grade I watched The Prince and Me at a slumber party and I loved how Julia Stiles’s character had a world map on her wall with pins positioned in places where she had been and would like to go. During my sophomore year of college, I made my own pinboard map for my dorm room using a corkboard, a store-bought map, and some quilting pins that I shortened with jewelry pliers to look just right. While other people are scrolling through Facebook or watching Netflix, I spend a great deal of time clicking my way through Google Maps and finding new places to visit. Whenever a friend tells me about their travels, I usually open the map app on my phone so that I can follow along as they tell me about the points of interest they visited.
maps - AtlanticNow that I have taken a liking to exploring the treasure trove of antique shops in New Hampshire, I have unintentionally started a collection of vintage geographical lovelies. So far, my set includes a 1941 map of the Atlantic Ocean and bordering countries (shown above), an 1898 map of Boston, a 1909 map of Washington DC, and 1960 map of London. Now I just have to find a use for all of them!

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